8 Simple Suggestions to Make Emails More Customer Service Friendly

8 Simple Suggestions to Make Emails More Customer Service Friendly

Many customer service managers think an email doesn’t have the potential to create or build positive relationships. Our research has proven otherwise.  Implement the following suggestions and customers will feel more welcomed, important and appreciated. The email can go a long way to help create an exceptional customer experience.

  1. Always start the email with the person’s name. We recommend using the first name, unless of course they only refer to themselves as, “Mr. or Mrs. Smith.”
  2. Try to start and end the email with a sentence not directly related to the issue, like, “ I hope you had a nice weekend” at the beginning and conclude with “ Have a wonderful day.”
  3. “Listen” for the underlying emotion of the question or complaint. Writing, “I hear you’re frustrated, disappointed, or concerned, but we are here to listen to you,”, will help to create a personal connection. If the customer sounds excited or happy, reference those emotions too.
  4. Read the email carefully for anything mentioned that might be personal. For example, a customer might write, “I just had a baby and wasn’t sure if your brand of shampoo would be safe.” Instead of just answering the question, connect and say, “Congratulations on your new baby.”
  5. Use the word help. Write, “I would like to help, I want to help you, I would be happy to help.” Employing the word help conveys a feeling of being “helpful.”  You may have to refer them to another source or even tell them that a product might be discontinued, but people still like to feel the agent is trying their best.
  6. Provide a telephone number and your hours of operation in case the email does not fully answer the question. Research has shown that customers generally prefer the company respond using the same communication channel as they initiated, but sometimes it’s more appropriate to have a conversation.
  7. If you know you are answering a question from a loyal customer, thank them for their loyalty. If the customer is new, thank them for selecting your company.
  8. Always sign the email with a person’s name, never with just the department. It could be fictitious, but that isn’t the point; it’s the personalization that creates the connection.

Implementing these suggestions won’t increase costs, but can help create exceptional customer experiences that increase sales and profitability.

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About the Author ()

Richard R. Shapiro is Founder and President of The Center For Client Retention (TCFCR) and a leading authority in the area of customer satisfaction and loyalty. For 28 years, Richard has spearheaded the research conducted with thousands of customers from Fortune 100 and 500 companies amassing the ingredients of customer loyalty and what drives repeat business. His first book was The Welcomer Edge: Unlocking the Secrets to Repeat Business and The Endangered Customer: 8 Steps to Guarantee Repeat Business, was released in February, 2016.

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